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Maryland Divorce Legal Crier

News and comments about divorce, child support, child custody, alimony, equitable property distribution, father’s rights, mother’s rights, family law, laws on divorce and other legal information in Maryland.

Archive for July, 2015

Can Alimony Be Longer Than The Marriage?

Wednesday, July 29th, 2015

Dr. Murray Malin, an anesthesiologist, was 38 when he met Marcie Minenberg, 27. She went to law school but did not pass the bar exam and was working in a jewelry store. They wed, had one child, and divorced in Maryland after three years of marriage. At the time of trial, Murray had stopped practicing as a doctor due to a drug addiction.

The trial court awarded Marcie alimony of $3,500 a month, non-taxable to her, for five years. Murray appealed arguing that (1) the court could not award alimony that was non-taxable and (2) the court could not award alimony for longer than the marriage.

The Maryland Court of Special Appeals agreed with Murray that the only alimony a court can award is taxable alimony. Parties can make alimony non-taxable, but only by agreement.

As for the length of alimony, the appeals court said there was no law against alimony that lasts longer than the marriage.

Malin v. Mininberg, 153 Md. App. 358, 837 A.2d 178 (2003)

Country Stars Divorce

Friday, July 24th, 2015

Country music stars Blake Shelton, 39, and Miranda Lambert, 31, announced their divorce this week after four years of marriage.

This was not like your mama’s broken heart.  There were rumors of cheating, denied by both.

The tabloids said Blake was mixed up with another woman.  I imagine her lips tasted like Sangria.

But rumors also surfaced that Miranda was involved with country singer Chris Young.

Young said “Aw naw, to another I will be true.”

Clean Desk or Messy Desk

Monday, July 13th, 2015

I was in another lawyer’s office the other day. There was not a single file nor paper in sight. Her desk was gleamingly naked save for a cup with pencils in it. The pencils were point up and freshly sharpened to exactly the same height. On the sidebar (yes, she had a sidebar), there were bottles of water on a tray with a glass pitcher full of crystal ice cubes. The coffee cups had the firm logo imprinted on them. I had the feeling if I looked closely enough, the ice cubes would too.

A clean desk indicates its owner has an organized mind and a disciplined approach to cases. After all, the practice of law is an obsessive compulsive type of job. You must pay careful attention to detail, deadlines and words.

There is another lawyer I know well who, despite his best efforts, has a rather messy office. It is filled with memorabilia, pictures, knick knacks and bric-a-bracs. There are papers and files all over his desk. These spill onto the floor which he uses as a filing system.

He reminds me of the clerk in the W.C. Fields movie who gets fired because of his rolltop desk over-stuffed with papers. But they have to hire him back when they can’t find an important contract. He sticks the point of his pencil into the stack of papers at the exactly the right place and pulls out the contract.

This lawyer with the messy desk is so good that he is in much demand. His file clerk cannot keep up with the files of clients clamoring for his time. His messy desk is the sign of a creative mind. He is unconventional and thinks outside the box. His creative solutions benefit his many clients.

Come visit my office sometime.  Here, let me just move that stack of papers.

Children Jailed by Michigan Judge for Refusal to Visit Dad

Friday, July 10th, 2015

The cases where the children refuse to visit a parent are among the most frustrating for parents, divorce lawyers, judges and therapists.

I’ve seen judges order months of reconciliation therapy. I’ve had one judge tell me, “I can’t send a crane to pickup the child and one house and drop them off at the other house.” Another judge said “A 15 year old can go almost anywhere they want on their own. A 15 year old can go to the bus station and buy a ticket.” None of these solutions are usually very satisfying to either parent.

Now one judge in Michigan has come up with a different idea. She is holding the children, ages 9, 10 and 15, in contempt for refusing to have lunch with their father and putting them in a juvenile detention center until they change their mind. The mother’s attorney has filed a writ of habeas corpus to free the children which is scheduled for July 15, 2015.

Read more about this case.

 
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